Herbs Well-suited to a Strawberry Jar

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Larger herbs plants should go at the top of your strawberry jar planter.Keep a pinch of fresh herbs for delicious meals just a few steps from the kitchen and all in one place–a strawberry jar. Originally designed as a novel way to grow clean strawberries, the pockets in a good-sized jar are big enough to hold an herb plant. Mix it up by planting one of each of your favorite herbs in each pocket. Good choices include sage, thyme, parsley, mint, oregano, and rosemary.

In a strawberry jar, insert the plants from inside, carefully protecting the stems and leaves of the plants.

Continue filling, one row at a time. The easiest way to insert the plants is to push them through the holes from the inside out. It is easier to wiggle the leaves through the hole from the inside than it is to cram the root ball through the hole from the outside. Just handle the stems gingerly to avoid breaking.

 

Here is a hint for planting. The natural inclination is to fill the jar to the top with potting soil and try to plant the pockets from the outside, but this ends up being very awkward. Instead, plant the jar in stages, a tier at a time, pushing the tops of plants through the pockets from the inside out. Fill as you plant and the plant that will grow largest, such as rosemary, at the very top.

Use a premium quality potting soil. This is very important because there are lots of roots trying to grow in a relatively small space. See our article, You Must Use A Good Potting Mix, in the Gardening section for more about how to select a good potting mix.

Water with a gentle stream, making sure to water at the top and each pocket along the sides of the jar to settle the soil. After the first good watering, you should be able to water just from the top. Mix Bonnie Herb and Vegetable Plant Food in the water to fertilize the plants.

10 thoughts on “Herbs Well-suited to a Strawberry Jar

  1. Which herbs grow the largest height wise and width wise so I know where to plant them. I have no experience with growing or drying herbs, has always been flowers or vegetables. If anyone knows how to grow catnip also and whether that can go in a strawberry jar would be great. My cat would be grateful I am sure, she loves catnip.

    • Hi Sarah,
      Herbs come in all shapes and sizes. Rosemary grows to 3 feet high and just as wide if you let it. Other herbs like thyme are low to the ground and sprawling. This is a list of all the herbs with their mature growth listed. Catnip is a mint and can grow up to 2 feet high (or higher) and a foot wide. It may take over the strawberry jar.
      Happy Gardening,
      Danielle

  2. LOVE the herb garden idea in a strawberry jar. I just received a beautiful ceramic strawberry pot from a fundraiser auction . . . it is beautifully planted with veges and herbs for making salsa — A tomato plant in the top and in the side pockets are onions, hot peppers and cilantro. My concern is that except for the cilantro all of these plants need more room to grow and will need to be transferred right away. Can someone give me a bit of guidance here? Thanks!

    • Hi Debra,

      This container sounds beautiful! Congrats on winning it in the auction. What you should do depends on a few things. How large is the container? Does it have good soil? If it’s a pretty large strawberry planter with good potting mix, you could try letting these grow in place and see what happens. If the container is small, though, you’ll want to transplant the tomato and pepper into larger containers or into the ground, and then replant the onions and cilantro in the small strawberry pot. Let us know how it grows!

      Kelly, Bonnie Plants

      • Thank you! The pot is 15 inches high and 11 inches diameter at the top, of course rounding out larger at the bottom half. The tomato plant in the top might be okay, although it may need a lot of support . . . the hot peppers are stuffed into the pockets and may get a bit bushy and goofy looking and need repotted . . . . And, I’m not sure about the onions — they appear to be regular onions – Ruby. Can you harvest onions at any size, because if they get too big, they will not come out of the pocket? I know tons about flower gardens, but nothing about growing vegetables. Thank you so much for your assistance. :D

        • Hi Debra,

          Yes, you can harvest “spring” onions a few weeks after planting at any size that suits you. Learn more about onions in our Growing Onions article. I’m glad you’re venturing into vegetable gardening! You’ll find lots of info on our website, so check out the articles in our Gardening and How to Grow sections.

          Happy growing!
          Kelly, Bonnie Plants

  3. I forgot about the pipe down the middle! Never again for berries! At least I planted it right!!

    • Hi Alice,

      What happened to your berries without the pipe down the middle? Just wondering. Thanks!

      Kelly, Bonnie Plants

  4. To make it easier to insert the plants through the hole without injury, make a tube of newspaper around the leaves and rootball. You can then handle the paper (instead of the leaves) as you insert the plant up through the hole.

    Also, watering evenly in a strawberry jar is tough (often the top gets watered and the bottom plants dry out). I place a small cup (like a yogurt container) upright over the drain hole at the bottom of the jar then a tube of old screen the same height as the jar (about the same width as a paper-towel roll) loosely filled with large pebbles/gravel just to keep its shape, then I plant as above. When I water I fill the tube so water gets evenly distributed bottom to top. The cup prevents the water from just running quickly out the bottom. If you have a mosquito problem, you can put a little piece of screen over the top of the tube – - but I have never had standing water remain in the tube.

    Another solution is to ‘plant’ a plastic bottle (in which you have poked many holes) into the center of the jar, with the top exposed and water into the bottle. DO NOT CAP the bottle or you water will not weep into the pot. To prevent mosquitos, you can cover the bottle opening with a bit of screen and secure it with a zip tiw, twist tie or weather resistant cord.

    Happy gardening!

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