Ozark Beauty Strawberry
Large, sweet berries from late spring through autumn.

Ozark Beauty Strawberry

2.00 out of 5
(4 customer reviews)

  • Light: Full sun
  • Type: Everbearing; perennial in zones 4 to 8
  • Plant spacing: 18 inches apart
  • Plant size: 8 to 10 inches tall, 18 inches wide

This everbearing variety produces high yields of large, very sweet fruit from late spring until frost, with concentrated fruiting in summer and again in fall. Ideal for jam, preserves, or desserts. Plants are cold-hardy and send out long runners. Great for containers.

Some Bonnie Plants varieties may not be available at your local stores, as we select and sell varieties best suited to the growing conditions in each region.

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4 reviews for Ozark Beauty Strawberry

  1. Taste:
    1 out of 5

    Yield:
    2 out of 5

    :

    ozark beauty strawberries: my plants only produce in june

  2. Taste:
    1 out of 5

    Yield:
    1 out of 5

    :

    Everbearing or Neverbearing?: I bought my Ozark Beauties at Lowes on May 12, 2012, and planted them right away. The plants look great; however, they have never produced any berries. They have never even flowered. I’m beginning to think they are the “neverbearing” variety.

  3. Taste:
    1 out of 5

    Yield:
    1 out of 5

    :

    The plants do not produce fruit: I cannot recommend this plant. It looks healthy and sends out runners but has yet to produce one berry. Other berries planted at the same time are producing.

  4. Taste:
    5 out of 5

    Yield:
    5 out of 5

    :

    If only I could keep the blooms: I purchased a few of these plants at a local home improvement garden center. This is my first year growing strawberries, and these have been growing well in a container. I did allow a few of the first blooms to produce fruit in early spring, even though all the advice I read online recommended otherwise. My kids were dying to taste home grown berries. They loved the ones that ripened in late spring. After I let them sample a couple, i plucked the blooms and runners to allow strong root growth. It's now August and I see the signs of another wave of blossoms on the horizon. I guess I should pluck those as well (sigh). If we get alot of berries next spring, it will be worth it.

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