Why Grow Vegetables and Herbs in Pots?

Tomatoes, peppers, and other vegetables will grow well in containers on a porch.

A group of pots on the patio is an easy way to keep tomatoes, peppers, or other favorites at your fingertips.

If you do not have room for a big garden, grow vegetables and herb in pots. Why pots? The reasons are many, but here are a few:

Convenience: Nothing is more convenient when you need a tomato or a pinch of fresh basil than to step out the kitchen door to your container garden of vegetables and herbs.

Sun: Sometimes the sun you need to grow veggies and herbs is only found on a patio, deck, or the edge of the driveway. For full-sun plants (check the plant’s stick tag for sun requirements), put containers wherever you can see your shadow most of the day. If you live in an apartment or condo, containers may be the only space available.

Perfect Soil: Often the soil around a newer home is poor because it is down to the subsoil and compacted by machinery. You will spend less time, money, and effort to plant in containers of potting mix until you can build good soil in a garden spot.

Less Water: It takes less water to keep a few pots watered than to water a plot of ground. In fact, catching water that would otherwise be wasted makes gardening in pots most efficient. Just keep a watering can by the sink and fill it with cool water any time you are waiting for the hot water to make its way from the tank to the tap.

Plant vigor: Wherever you live, your soil may be heavy with clay or too much dry sand. Growing vegetables in potting mix makes plants grow faster and remain healthier, giving you the most produce for your effort, at least until you can build up the soil in the ground.

Enabling: Children take to a container garden because the soil is good, success is likely, pots are easy to reach, and they can call a pot their own. Likewise, a container is appealing to an older gardener or a physically challenged gardener because there is less bending and the project is a manageable size. Both may need help with the initial set up because of the weight of large pots and bags of soil.

Beat soil problems: Growing things in pots avoids serious, persistent soil-borne problems such as sweet potato weevils, septoria leaf spot, or root knot nematodes. This is good alternative if you just can’t get these problems under control in your garden plot.