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FAQs

Our most frequently asked questions. Feel free to contact us if your question isn't answered here.

Billing & Shipping FAQs

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Planting & Growing FAQs

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Plant FAQs

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Billing, Shipping and Service

What is your guarantee and return policy? What if my plant arrives damaged?

We understand that a plant's journey to its new home can be a bumpy one. We work hard to ensure our innovative packaging keeps them happy along the way, but plants are living, breathing things and sometimes the adventure gets a little too hectic along the way.

If your plant looks dead on arrival or has an issue with the first 10 days after delivery, please contact us with a picture of your plant so we can help get you a new, healthy replacement plant.

Who do I contact with issues? Please contact orders@bonnieplants.com with proper proof (an image of your plant & your order number) to receive a replacement or refund for any online purchases.

How can I check my order status?

You can check your order status by visiting your account dashboard.

How much does shipping cost?

We offer $7.95 fixed flat rate shipping for all orders below $35 and Free Shipping for all orders $35 or over.

How do I contact consumer services?

Please contact orders@bonnieplants.com with proper proof (an image of your plant & your order number) to receive a replacement or refund for any online purchases.

It is too early to transplant in my region, can I delay my shipment?

Unfortunately, we are not yet offering delayed shipping options. If it's too early to transplant in your region, we encourage you to place your order later.

How do you ship a live plant so that it won't get damaged?

We really care about plants. That’s why we've developed an innovative packaging system that allows us to send plants to you, safe and sound, right in the mail. Plus, we use expedited shipping to ensure that your plants spend as little time as possible in transit. So you can build your perfect garden without ever having to visit the store.

When will my order ship?

We typically ship on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays to ensure that your plants arrive on a weekday and are not held up in a shipping warehouse over the weekend.

Orders placed on Mondays and Tuesdays will typically ship the same or next day. Orders placed early on Wednesday will typically ship same day. Orders placed in evening hours on Wednesdays, or on Thursdays and Fridays will typically ship on the following Monday. We do not ship on holidays.

How do I get a refund?

Please contact orders@bonnieplants.com with proper proof (an image of your plant & your order number) to receive a replacement or refund for any online purchases.

How do I cancel my order?

If you have just placed your order, and it has not yet shipped, you can cancel by visiting your account dashboard and canceling there. You can also call our consumer service team to cancel.

If your order has already shipped, please call our consumer service team so we can discuss options.

What payment methods do you accept?

We gladly accept major credit cards including Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express. We also accept Apple Pay, and Google Wallet.

Planting and Growing

What should I do when my plant arrives?

1. Remove Packaging Take each individual Bonnie Plant out of the box before carefully opening each individual plant’s packaging. Be cautious of soil that may have shifted during transportation.

2. Check the Soil Your plants were watered right before shipping, but they may have become thirsty during travel. If the soil is dry to the touch, give your plants a good drink before planting.

3. Adjustment Period Let your plants get used to their new environment. Set them in a warm, sunny spot for 24 to 48 hours so they can recover from their trip before being planted.

When should I transplant my plant?

To learn the best historical time to transplant each of your plant, visit the associated product page and enter your ZIP for your transplant window. Of course, weather varies from year to year, so always check local conditions.

What does "transplant" mean?

Transplanting is simply the act of removing your Bonnie starter plants from their pots and planting them in your garden or a container/planter.

How do I know if a plant is suitable to grow in my area?

Most of the vegetable and herb plants we sell on this site can be grown outdoors throughout the Continental US - however it is important to transplant your starter plant at the right time based on the weather and climate in your area. To get your transplant window, visit the associated product page and enter your ZIP code.

Many of our herb plants can also be grown indoors so long as you have sufficient light and water. If you grow herbs indoors, you will still need to transplant your herb plants into properly sized containers with added potting mix.

What is a USDA Hardiness Zone?

The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree F zones. To learn more, visit https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/

How does Bonnie choose which plants to sell online and which to only sell in store?

Bonnie Plants is the #1 grower of vegetable and herb plants in the country and we offer hundreds of varieties available at garden centers. For our online store, we've curated a selection of some of our most popular varieties and some rarities too, and make them available at different times throughout the year.

How many plants come in each order?

Most of the plants we sell on bonnieplants.com come in 2-packs, which come in 4.5-5 Inch pots. In a handful of instances, we also offer a more mature plant sold as a 1-pack in a one gallon pot.

How do I care for my plants once I receive them?

Your plant will come with both a care sheet and a plant tag, which gives you information on plant spacing, watering, sunlight and other important considerations to get you started.

Bonnie also has in-depth "How to Grow" guides available on our main site, www.bonnieplants.com.

My tomato plant is producing flowers, but no fruit. What's wrong?

The most likely culprit is high temperatures. Though tomatoes are self-pollinating, when temperatures rise above 85 to 90 degrees F (depending on humidity) during the day and 75 degrees F at night, the pollen can't do its job. Humidity can also come into play. When there's too much of it, pollen may become so sticky that it does not fall. On the other end of the spectrum, in the arid regions, pollen may become so dry that it does not stick to the female part of the flower. The best thing to do is to keep your plants healthy and fertilized, and be patient. The plants will start to produce again when the weather becomes favorable. Note, though, that heirloom tomatoes can be even fussier about temperatures than most hybrid tomatoes, and in some areas will wait until late summer or early fall to start setting fruit.

Why isn't my cabbage forming a head?

Chances are, it's too warm. Cabbages need cool weather, and will not form heads if the temperature is over 80 degrees F, due to the stress on the plant.

Plant FAQs

Where do my Bonnie Plants® come from?

Not far from where you are! We have over 70 growing stations spread across the country, so our plants don’t have to travel far to make it to your garden. That means less time spent in transit, which is better for the plants and for the planet, too. What’s more, each growing station grows varieties that tend to perform well in that particular region, so you don’t have to wonder whether the Bonnie veggies and herbs you buy are suitable for the area you live in.

Why are the bottoms of my tomatoes turning black?

Your tomatoes have something called blossom end rot, usually caused by a lack of calcium and/or stress from changes in moisture. Read our article on blossom end rot to learn more and find out what to do about it.

My squash plant was healthy, then all of a sudden it wilted. What happened?

When squash vines suddenly collapse, chances are it’s the work of squash vine borers, larvae that burrow into the plant and eat through the stem. Once this happens, you have two options: ignore them and harvest what your plant will give you until it finally succumbs (it won’t take long), or try your hand at surgery to remove them. If you have more than two months left in the growing season, you can also plant another batch of squash and watch them carefully from the beginning. Keep a eye out for squash borer eggs — they look like tiny brown seeds and are usually found near the base of the plant. If you see any, remove them immediately.

Why doesn't my hot pepper have any heat?

The hotness of hot peppers depends on how much capsaicin (an alkaloid) is produced. Capsaicin levels vary by variety and are genetically determined, but are also influenced by temperature (the ideal temperature for growing hot peppers is between 70 and 85 degrees F) and cultural conditions, such as the amount of fertilizer and water provided to the plant. Generally, peppers are hotter after they have changed color and are fully ripe. Some hybrids just take a while to develop heat, so be patient: If you pick the fruits before they’re fully mature, they won’t be hot.

Why do my cucumbers taste bitter?

This is a common problem caused by high temperatures, dry soil, low fertility, or disease. Once a plant produces a bitter cucumber, it must be removed because all subsequent cucumbers will be affected in the same way. Also, don’t let cucumbers get oversized on the vine, or they will become bitter.

How often do I need to water my plants?

A good rule of thumb is an inch of water per week, either by rain or watering; in arid climates, double that. In hot weather, vegetables need even more water, up to about a half an inch extra per week for every 10 degrees that the average temperature is above 60 degrees. You can measure an inch of water by putting a rain gauge or other container under your sprinkler, soaker, drip, or other watering system. You’ve applied an inch of water when the vessel collects water an inch deep. Container gardens may need to be watered more frequently than in-ground garden beds, so check the soil each day and add water if the top inch or so of potting soil is dry.

Why aren't my cauliflower plants forming heads?

In young broccoli and cauliflower plants, something called “buttoning” can occur when they experience stress, especially too-cold temperatures. Heads begin to develop prematurely, but never grow very big, and break up as soon as the flower stalk begins to grow. You can find a list of ways to prevent buttoning at the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service’s website.

Why do my squash/cucumber plants have lots of blooms but no fruit?

Cucurbits like squash and cucumbers have both male and female flowers, and need cross-pollination between the two. If something like heat or rain is keeping bees or other pollinators from doing their job properly, fruit often either won’t appear, or if it does, it will be small and shriveled. One solution is to try pollinating your cucurbits by hand. Read our article on hand-pollinating for instructions, and to see photos of male and female flowers.

Why are there spots on my tomato leaves?

It sounds like your tomato may be suffering from a fungal leaf spot. Remove any affected leaves, seal them in a bag, and dispose of them. Then, apply a fungicide, such as chlorothalonil (Daconil) or a copper-based fungicide (the organic alternative), to the plant; be sure to follow label instructions. To help prevent leaf spot in the first place, try to water in the morning, aiming the spray at the base of the plants to keep foliage dry to help prevent disease from taking hold. Mulching around your plant can also prevent water from splashing up onto the leaves (plus, it helps to conserve moisture and keep weeds to a minimum). You may also want to spray all of your tomato and pepper plants preventatively with one of the fungicides mentioned above; again, follow all directions.

Why are the leaves on my pepper/tomato/eggplant turning yellow?

Yellowing on the older leaves is commonly caused by a lack of nitrogen, which can be the result of overwatering. Most vegetables only need an inch to an inch and a half of water a week from rainfall and/or irrigation. Feed your plant more nitrogen by using a liquid fertilizer specifically for vegetables, such as Miracle-Gro® Water Soluble Plant Food for Vegetables & Herbs. Follow the directions on the label, and apply as often recommendations allow, because peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants are all heavy feeders.

Why does my tomato plant have curled leaves?

Leaf curl is usually a response to environmental stress, such as too much heat or too much (or too little) water. Leaves may curl after a huge amount of rainfall or when the soil dries out. Tomatoes need an inch to an inch and a half of water a week from rainfall and/or irrigation. In a container, they need watering when the top inch or so of potting soil becomes dry to the touch. Leaf curl is more common in indeterminate varieties of tomatoes than determinate varieties. Either way, the condition should correct itself once the stress goes away.

Why is my plant wilting?

Wilting is most commonly the result of either over- or under-watering. Most plants only need between an inch and an inch and a half of water a week. If the plant is growing in a container, water when the top inch or so of potting soil becomes dry to the touch. It is best to water in the morning, at the base of the plant — that will help keep the foliage dry, which can deter some kinds of diseases. Mulching around plants can also help stave off disease by keeping water from splashing up onto the leaves; in addition, mulch helps keep weeds down and conserve moisture so you have to water less.

Why aren't my peppers turning color the way they're supposed to?

Have patience. It can take quite a while for peppers to turn from green to the red, yellow, or orange hue you’re waiting for. Chances are, your peppers just need a little more time.

My tomato plant is producing flowers, but no fruit. What's wrong?

The most likely culprit is high temperatures. Though tomatoes are self-pollinating, when temperatures rise above 85 to 90 degrees F (depending on humidity) during the day and 75 degrees F at night, the pollen can’t do its job. Humidity can also come into play. When there’s too much of it, pollen may become so sticky that it does not fall. On the other end of the spectrum, in the arid regions, pollen may become so dry that it does not stick to the female part of the flower. The best thing to do is to keep your plants healthy and fertilized, and be patient. The plants will start to produce again when the weather becomes favorable. Note, though, that heirloom tomatoes can be even fussier about temperatures than most hybrid tomatoes, and in some areas will wait until late summer or early fall to start setting fruit.

Does Bonnie sell GMO plants?

No. Every plant we sell is grown from non-GMO seed.