Warm Season Gardening

How to Store Summer Vegetables

When your summer harvest starts coming in fast and furiously, it can be a little overwhelming. While your first instinct may be to just put it all in the fridge and hope it’ll last until you can eat it, the average refrigerator temperature is simply too cold for many warm-weather crops.

Natural Weeding Techniques

Got too many weeds competing with your garden or fostering problem insects? Tackle them — and keep your garden chemical-free — with these natural weeding techniques.

How to Grow Tomatoes in Hot Weather

Sizzling summer temperatures can bring your previously productive tomato plants to a screeching halt. When days hit 85°F to 90°F and nights hover above 75°F, tomato flowers often fail to pollinate, then drop — which in turn puts new fruit production on hold.

Garden Games for Kids

Raise a crop of lifelong gardeners by getting kids outside and in the dirt with one of these fun garden games. You’ll find your backyard is full of surprises, wonder, and endless moments of play.

Summer Maintenance for Your Vegetable Garden

To ensure that your plants continue producing as temperatures rise, it’s important to spend plenty of time in the garden. Here’s a how-to guide for keeping those vegetables fed, watered, and happy during these hot summer months.

Vacation Survival Guide for Your Garden

By Su Reid-St. John Sure, that beach vacation you’ve been planning is going to feel like heaven to you – but it won’t to your garden. That’s because a week or two without the usual TLC can leave your plants feeling dry and wilted, not to mention vulnerable to all sorts of critters and ailments…. Read more »

Which Veggies for Which Season?

Because a vegetable needs either warm or cool weather, crops sort themselves into two distinct categories: cool season (for spring and fall) and warm season (for summer). Planting in the proper season is the first step to a bountiful garden. FOR SPRING AND FALL: Plant the hardy and semi-hardy vegetables below in early spring for spring harvests and again in… Read more »

Summer Herb Harvesting Tips

In summer, herb gardeners get a delicious payoff for all of their efforts. Oddly enough, this is when some gardeners become timid, unsure what to do next because the plants are so full and beautiful, it seems a shame to trim them. Never fear! Here is some advice for clipping with confidence. Before starting, make… Read more »

Hot Summer Tips for Watering the Garden

When it doesn’t rain enough, turn on the spigot. Veggies need water to produce, so watering the garden correctly is crucial in the hot summer. Tomatoes are especially unforgiving if they dry out. Going from dry to wet and back again creates problems like blossom end rot. And that’s not all. Have you seen cracks… Read more »

Harvest Guide to Summer Veggies

Use this harvest guide to recognize when your beans, tomatoes, squash, and other summer vegetables are at the peak of flavor. Beans You may pick snap beans when they are very young and serve them as baby snap beans, or you can wait until they reach full size for a more bountiful harvest. Use two… Read more »

For Early Tomatoes, Try This

Want to bite into your first homegrown tomato soon? Here are four easy ways to speed the harvest. Normally, tomatoes are planted at least two weeks after the last frost, but with steps 2 and 3, you can cheat the calendar. If you live where the weather is already warm, step 1 is all you need… Read more »

Drought-Busting Techniques

As summer heats up, use these drought-busting techniques to keep your garden watered, healthy, and productive throughout the season.

Drought Busters Respond With Many Good Ideas

Read these great ideas from some of your fellow Bonnie gardeners dealing with drought. Plastic Mulch in Black, Green, or Red I mulch the garden at spring planting with black, green, and red plastic mulch, depending on the plants I am transplanting, and then rely on drip irrigation buried beneath the plastic. The mulch warms… Read more »

Basil Insists on Blooming. Pinch It!

Basil blooming? Don’t let it, if you want to keep that harvest coming. If you allow the plant to flower, it tells itself, “I’ve fulfilled my life’s purpose by making seed, so I can just stop growing.”